Smelling Farts Could Be Good For Your Health: 10 Flatulence Facts

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Smelling Farts Could Be Good For Your Health: 10 Flatulence Facts

Smelling Farts Could Be Good For Your Health: 10 Flatulence Facts

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Everybody farts. Girl, you know it’s true. Famous people, military personal, civilians, your grandma, and the cute guy next door — all farters. There’s no escaping that reality, so let’s embrace some facts about farting.

1. The word “fart” comes from Old English: Humans and animals have farted throughout history, but “fart” first appeared as a slang germ in 1632. The word actually derives from the Old English word “feortan,” which translates into “to break wind.”

2: “Professional fart smeller” is a real job: In China, professional fart smellers can make up to $50,000 per year for this job (which aims to pinpoint specific illnesses from fart quality) in the medical sector. Other cultures embrace farts too. In South America, the Yanomami tribe use farts as a greeting.

3. Termites fart more than any other animal (including humans, who are #8): These pests aren’t simply chewing your house apart as we speak. Termites are also the 2nd leading natural source of methane emissions (behind the wetlands). Following closely behind termites are camels, zebras, sheep, and cows.

4. Farts travel relatively fast: Farts are speedy little critters, although their velocity can vary. Some farts move as quickly as 10 miles per hour. That’s faster than the speed at which most people can run.

5. Smelling farts could be beneficial: A study at England’s University of Exeter suggests that smelling hydrogen sulfide gas from rotten eggs and flatulance could treat disease by preserving mitochondria. This discovery carries potential for reducing the risk of cancer, dementia, strokes, and arthritis.

6. Farts can carry germs under certain circumstances: An article in the British Medical Journal proved that a naked person’s farts can blow bacteria onto a petri dish. If that same person is wearing clothes, the effect is rendered mercifully absent.

7. The frequency of farts is high: People generally pass about half a liter of flatulence each day, and most people fart at least 14 times per day. Don’t believe it? Go ahead and count. I dare you.

8. People fart (and burp) even after they die: On average, corpses will fart for nearly 3 hours after death. These gasses come from both ends, mostly because human muscles continue to contract and expand until rigor mortis occurs.

9. Farts are chemically complex annoyances: Five major ingredients make up most farts. These range from nitrogen (59%) to hydrogen (21%), carbon dioxide (9%), methane (7%) and oxygen (4%). Sulfur is the culprit for what makes farts smell bad. Foods like cabbage, beans, eggs, onions, and broccoli contain the most sulfur.

10. Fart lighting is a highly dangerous practice: The highly flammable methane and hydrogen within farts has led to many fart-lighting associated trips to the emergency room. Don’t do it, kids. Just don’t do it.

Related topics Animals, farts, sulfur, termites
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