7 Surprising, Non-Food Uses For Hot Peppers

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7 Surprising, Non-Food Uses For Hot Peppers

7 Surprising, Non-Food Uses For Hot Peppers

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Hot peppers are delicious and perk up almost any meal. Did you know that peppers can be useful outside the kitchen as well? Nope, this isn’t The Hunger Games, but here are some magnificent uses for hot peppers.

1. Pepper sprays can be used as a natural pesticide: Think about how hot peppers can burn your human mouth. Now imagine them working that magic at an exponential level on an insect. These sprays have been used for outdoor bug control for several decades. The good news is that the spray shouldn’t affect your garden, just the pests.

2. Peppers containing capsaicin combat indigestion: This factoid is difficult to believe and sounds counterproductive. Yet capsaicin forces the body to rush blood to the stomach. Capsaicin stimulates the stomach and tricks it into producing juices to combat the indigestion. Bonus: Capsaicin murders H. Pylori (a bacteria causing stomach upset) in its tracks.

3. Defensive pepper sprays can be homemade or commercial: When sprayed directly on the skin in a concentrated form, capsaicin can create intense pain, skin irritation, and uncontrollable eye watering. Effective for use on humans and wildlife.

4. Capsaicin can also dull pain as an anesthetic: Although this substance can be the source of pain, it can also be used to dull the unpleasant sensation. When used in a topical anesthetic, the capsaicin generates heat in products like Icy Hot.

5. Cancer research using capsaicin is promising This substance can slow the growth of many types of cancer cells, including those of the prostate variety. Of course, some researchers also believe capsaicin carries carcinogenic properties, which makes this topic super awkward.

6. Losing weight with the help of capsaicin is technically possible. It sounds like a myth, right? Not quite. The substance does increase the rate at which a person converts energy into heat. It does so by attaching to muscle proteins snf, preventing calcium from doing its part in the muscle relaxation cycle. So yes, hot peppers do boost metabolism … by how much, who knows.

7. Capsaicin can help keep you warm in the winter: If you sprinkle some of this pepper into socks and shoes, it will help warm your feet. It makes total sense, right? Just don’t use too much, or you’ll be hopping back and forth and soaking your feet in a bathtub like a comic book character.

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Related topics Capsaicin, Pain Relief, Peppers
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