7 Fraudulent Ads That Led to Big and Hefty Lawsuits

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7 Fraudulent Ads That Led to Big and Hefty Lawsuits

7 Fraudulent Ads That Led to Big and Hefty Lawsuits

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Although commercials are the best way to advertise products and services, but sometimes companies aren’t exactly truthful in their ads. Here are 7 fraudulent ads that led to lawsuits.

1. Red Bull. The energy drink company claimed that Red Bull gave people “wings,” in terms of      energy and concentration. However, Red Bull had to settle $13 million in a class action lawsuit in   false advertising because Red Bull doesn’t literally give you wings. Some people felt tricked into buying the beverage in the belief that it would make you fly.

Red-Bull

2. Activia. Dannon was selling its Activia yogurt as a clinical and scientific advantage to your digestion. However, Activia is just like any other yogurt on the market and consumers felt tricked because of its supposed health benefits. Dannon had to pay $45 million in damages to the consumers in a class-action lawsuit against Activia’s claims.

Activia

3. Groupon. A tourist company based in San Francisco sued Groupon for gaming Google Search. Apparently, Groupon used keywords tourists would use for advertising purposes instead of offering deals on tourist attractions. The company felt duped into going to Groupon’s site on false pretenses. The lawsuits is still ongoing.

Groupon

4. Airborne. We’ve all used Airborne or a Vitamin C supplement like Airborne at one time to fight off a cold before it started, but apparently, Airborne isn’t proven to do anything for your immune system. A class-action lawsuit against Airborne resulted in the company paying $23.3 million in damages, plus an additional $7 million in a settlement.

Airborne

5. Taco Bell. Apparently, Taco Bell was using oat filler as main additive in its taco “seasoned beef.” According to the USDA, oat filler isn’t seasoned beef and customers sued Taco Bell for false claims. It isn’t seasoned and it’s barely beef.  Eventually, the woman who started the lawsuit against Taco Bell settled out of court with the fast food restaurant chain and the lawsuit was dropped.

Taco-Bell

6. Eclipse Gum. In 2009, consumers sued Wrigley for false advertising when their Eclipse gum claimed to kill germs inside of your mouth. The truth is, it doesn’t and Wrigley had to pay. According to Businessweek, “As part of the settlement, Wrigley will change how it markets and labels its gum. It agreed to pay $6 million to $7 million to a fund that will reimburse consumers up to $10 each for the product and cover other costs of the settlement, according to the law firms Blood Hurst & O’Reardon and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd.”

Eclipse-Gum

7. Apple iPhone 3G. In 2008, Apple claimed their then-new iPhone 3G was “twice as fast, at half the price” than its previous model. Apparently, both statements weren’t true. Five years later, Apple paid $53 million in a class action lawsuit for faulty iPhone 3G devices.

Apple-iPhone-3G

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