11 Facts About Venoms and Poisons To Make Your Skin Crawl

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Trivial Diversions

11 Facts About Venoms and Poisons To Make Your Skin Crawl

11 Facts About Venoms and Poisons To Make Your Skin Crawl

Straight from the land of Nope, come the poisonous and venomous animals whose toxins are not just scary, but sometimes downright deadly. Poisons have the ability to mess with your body’s functions while toxins are biologically produced to cause mayhem to anyone or thing it enters.

1. Who newt?

The rough-skinned newt is the most poisonous animal in the United States. The skin of said critter contains a poison 10,000 times deadlier than cyanide.

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2. Taste test. It takes legal approval to serve pufferfish in Japan. Chefs that wish to do so must eat one of the poisonous fish as part of the test to gain legal permission to serve them.

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3. The Headless….Snakeman?

A snake that has been beheaded is still capable of biting hours after its death. Snakes are unable to regulate how much venom they let out, causing postmortem bites to contain a lot of venom.

4. Liquid gold?

People often think that crude oil is one of the most expensive liquids in the world. But to put things into perspective, how about a little price comparison:  At the time of this article’s publication crude oil is $2.62 at $60.30 per barrel (42 gallons), however, scorpion venom is around $38.8 million per gallon. Can’t run my car on that…

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5.  Cobras, tarantulas, jellyfish, oh my!

100 times more poisonous than a cobra and 1,000 times more powerful than a tarantula is the Australian Irukandji jellyfish, which is a meager cm in diameter, enjoys long walks on the beach and firing stingers from its tentacles causing excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face, headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena such as the feeling of impending doom. Basically a panic attack, flu, kidney infection all wrapped into one.

6. No shirt, no shoes, no antidote.

The Blue-Ringed Octopus is one of the smallest, deadliest animals and there is no antidote to its venom.

7. Hornets-From-Hell.

The venom of giant hornets in Japan is strong enough to dissolve human flesh. They are responsible for killing about 40 people each year after being stung, mainly as a result of an Jallergic reaction to the venom.

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Not all venom is bad…

8. Copperhead venom contains a protein that halts cancer cell growth as well as the migration of tumors cells.

9.  The Brazilian Wandering Spider is the most venomous spider on earth. It can cause male erections and its venom is being researched to help erectile dysfunction.

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10.  The Conus snail venom could potentially be used to make a pain-killer a thousand times more powerful than Morphine and still not be addictive.

11. Nanoparticles containing bee venom toxin (melittin) can be used to destroy HIV while at the same time sparing surrounding cells.

 

Related topics Animals, Australia, bee venom toxin, Blue-Ringed Octopus, cobra, copperhead, deadly animals, deadly poison, Food, Fun Facts, HIV, Japanese hornet, jellyfish, Nanoparticles, newt, poisons, pufferfish, scorpion, snakes, tarantula, toxins, venoms
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